Postcard from Singapore: Satay

We had satay outdoor at a unique Satay market off The Old Market in the business district of Singapore.

The Old Market is affectionately called Lau Pa Sat by the local Chinese. Lao means old, Pa Sat means Pasar, a Malay word for market. Lau Pa Sat’s proper name is Telok Ayer Market.

Outside this historic Victorian building of 150 years is the satay paradise in Singapore.

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You need these for satay: ketupat (delicious packed rice in a woven palm leave pouch), charcoal, fan, satay sticks.

The essence of Satay

We got to the market before 7pm when  it was reasonably quiet. A while later, as the fasting ended for Muslims, the street got much busier, bursting with joy and happiness.

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27 thoughts on “Postcard from Singapore: Satay

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  2. Hari Qhuang

    I love satay! I have tried many different styles of satay wherever I go. I once ate satay in the Chinatown in Singapore and I was kinda disappointed that they roast it by using a flat pan instead of charcoal.

    Reply
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