Tag Archives: Changi Murals

Remembrance Day in Southampton

Historical posts have dominated my posts recently. I meandered through the conflicts during Malayan Emergency from 1948-1960, the Batang Kali killings in 1948 with no closure yet, and how Stanley Warren’s Changi Murals are evocative of pain, endurance and hope.

In the thick jungles which blotted out the sun, where the humid warmth was stifling,  340 UK troops died in Malaya during 1948-60. BBC News charted a graph listing Where they fell. The UK WW1 war dead was 886,342, and the WWII war dead was 383,667. Continue reading

The Uplifting Changi Murals and Stanley Warren

In 1958, there was an international search for a mysterious artist. The only clue was that the artist was a prisoner of war in Singapore after the Fall of Singapore in February 1942, which was described by Winston Churchill as the worst disaster and largest capitulation in British history.

Five large murals of scenes from the New Testament were discovered in Changi prisoner of war camp in Singapore. These murals touched many hearts and shocked the world. Who was the artist who painted the near life-size murals in the chapel of St. Luke there? Who was the artist who yearned for hope and peace in the darkest days of despair through his biblical paintings?

Last week, Lorelle vanFossen highlighted an extensive search using satellite images in Google Earth for the aviator and balloonist Steve Fossett, after he was reported missing flying his plane over the Nevada desert in 2007. In the non-digital age in 1958, the search for the prisoner-of-war artist proved difficult. He could have been any of the 50,000 allied soldiers detained by the Japanese. Was the artist British, Australian, Dutch, or Indian? Was he still alive? Did he later get sent to build the Death Railway in Thailand and Burma and manage to return? Continue reading